Another series of thoughts on that perennial favorite, the classic chocolate chip cookie

Ok, so I haven’t posted anything about chocolate chip cookies for at least 6 months.  After all, I thought I had written the quintessential article on the subject with my post

The without a doubt absolutely very best chocolate chip cookie!

originally published March 15, 2015, and revised in March of this year.  There have been a couple of recipes published that I think have merit, and I want to put them out there for everyone (including me) to try.  The first one is one published in the NY Times by Julia Moskin, a recipe of Danielle Oron (here is the link: )

salted tahini chocolate chip cookies


  • 4 ounces/113 grams unsalted butter at room temperature
  • ½ cup/120 milliliters tahini, well stirred
  • 1 cup/200 grams granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons/150 grams all-purpose flour, or matzo cake meal (See tip)
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 ¾ cups/230 grams chocolate chips or chunks, bittersweet or semisweet
  •  Flaky salt, like fleur de sel or Maldon


  1. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream butter, tahini and sugar at medium speed until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. Add egg, egg yolk and vanilla and continue mixing at medium speed for another 5 minutes.
  2. Sift flour, baking soda, baking powder and kosher salt into a large bowl and mix with a fork. Add flour mixture to butter mixture at low speed until just combined. Use a rubber spatula to fold in chocolate chips. Dough will be soft, not stiff. Refrigerate at least 12 hours; this ensures tender cookies.
  3. When ready to bake, heat oven to 325 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or nonstick baking mat. Use a large ice cream scoop or spoon to form dough into 12 to 18 balls.
  4. Place the cookies on the baking sheet at least 3 inches apart to allow them to spread. Bake 13 to 16 minutes until just golden brown around the edges but still pale in the middle to make thick, soft cookies. As cookies come out of the oven, sprinkle sparsely with salt. Let cool at least 20 minutes on a rack.

The use of the tahini in a cookie recipe should be very interesting, and I’m eager to try it and see what others think as well.

Stella Parks, aka Bravetart, an editor at Serious Eats, posted a recipe for “old fashioned chocolate chip cookies” and there are some things that we can agree on and some things that we can disagree with.  First, read the post at and look at the recipe:

Quick and Easy Chocolate Chip Cookies



  • 14 ounces assorted dark, milk, or white chocolate (not commercial chips), roughly chopped (2 1/2 cups; 395g)
  • 12 1/2 ounces all-purpose flour (2 3/4 cups, spooned; 355g), such as Gold Medal
  • 8 ounces unsalted butter (2 sticks; 225g), soft but cool, about 65°F (18°C)
  • 7 1/4 ounces white sugar (1 cup; 205g)
  • 8 ounces light brown sugar (1 cup, gently packed; 225g)
  • 1/2 ounce vanilla extract (1 tablespoon; 15g)
  • 2 teaspoons (8g) Diamond Crystal kosher salt, plus more for sprinkling; for table salt, use about half as much by volume or the same weight
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 1 large egg (about 1 3/4 ounces; 50g), straight from the fridge



Make the Dough: Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat to 350°F (180°C). Set aside a handful of chopped chocolate (about 2 ounces; 55g) and place the remainder in a medium bowl. Sift flour on top and toss together. Combine butter, white sugar, brown sugar, vanilla, salt, baking soda, baking powder, and nutmeg in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low to moisten, then increase to medium and beat until light and fluffy, about 5 minutes. With mixer running, add egg and continue beating only until smooth. Reduce speed to low, add flour/chocolate all at once, and mix to form a stiff dough.

2. Portion the Dough: Divide in 2-tablespoon portions (about 1 1/2 ounces or 40g each) and round each one into a smooth ball. (If you like, portioned dough can be refrigerated in a heavy-duty zipper-lock bag up to 1 week, or frozen 6 months. Stand at room temperature until quite soft, about 70°F or 21°C, and proceed as directed.)
3. To Bake: Arrange portions on a parchment-lined half sheet pan, leaving 2 inches between cookies to account for spread. Garnish each with reserved chocolate and a pinch of kosher salt. Bake until puffed and pale gold around the edges but steamy in the middle, about 15 minutes. For crunchy cookies, continue baking until golden, 3 to 5 minutes more. Cool directly on baking sheet until crumb is set, about 5 minutes. Enjoy warm or store in an airtight container up to 2 days at room temperature.
Now, I definitely think that chopping up chocolate for use in cookies is much better than using pre-made chocolate chips, except if you are using Valrhona, Callibaut or Belcolade chips.  The one advantage of chipping your own chunks off a big block of chocolate is that the fine dust of chocolate left on the cutting board is a great addition to the cookie dough.
I do take issue with Stella’s assertion that the dough is ready to bake right away without resting.  I agree with David Leite and many others that the resting of a chocolate chip cookie dough in the refrigerator for 36 hours makes for very definite and demonstrable differences, and the patience is worth the lack of immediate gratification.
So cookie lovers, here are two more variations to try.  Try them and let me know what you think.

About trustforce

A well trained amateur chef, I cook and enjoy many different cuisines. I can enjoy a great Chicago style hot dog or an Italian beef sandwich, or have equal pleasure from haut cuisine. The fun is getting it right, whether I make it or someone makes it for me. The big problem that I have with eating out is that I know too much about restaurants and I find it hard to ignore or forgive sloppy technique or bad ingredients. I pull no punches in my restaurant reviews! All my recipe postings are extensively tested by me unless I state otherwise (I will sometimes post a recipe that sounds like it should be good before I actually make it myself) and when I am not the originator they are correctly attributed to the source author, even if I have modified the recipe. Untested recipes that have been posted are revised once they have been made and evaluated in an effort to keep old posts accurate and current.
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